Bruce Turkel's Blog

Sales Made Easy 8 in a Series

Sales Made Easy 8 in a Series

There are many ways you can set yourself and your business apart: You can be cheaper, faster, better looking, closer, more innovative, better, higher quality, more convenient, or better known. You can be all of the above. Or you can be something else.
However, the best way to build your and demonstrate why you matter to your customers and your potential customers is to understand why you matter to them.
Sales Made Easy 8 says…

Sales Made Easy 5 in a Series

Sales Made Easy 5 in a Series

If you understand what you do, what your client wants, and where those two things intersect, you already know where to focus your time and attention. Sure, there are other things you can do. But just like that delayed flight, you're better off concentrating on the things you can affect and improve instead of busying yourself worrying about things that are out of your control.
Sales Made Easy 5 says…

Sales Made Easy 2 in a Series

Sales Made Easy 2 in a Series

Sales Made Easy 2: If you want to build your business, your number one job is to generate as much interest in you and your activities as possible to build relationships. And while there are no direct metrics to extrapolate how many lunches it takes to generate additional income, a good rule of thumb is this: the more, the merrier.
It all starts when you take them to lunch.

Sales Made Easy 1 in a Series

Sales Made Easy 1 in a Series

Decisions are made without all the facts all the time. Once the purchase decision has been made, more facts might reinforce the deal. But they could also kill it. Once you've got a “Yes,” why risk snatching defeat from the jaws of victory?
The simple solution in presentations—especially ones that go well—is to be quiet and let the buyer talk. To do that, remember Sales Made Easy 1: “Shut the @#$%!! up.”

Power of Simplicity

Power of Simplicity

Simplicity in design also helps create a sense of calm, aids in comprehension, and provides an attractive focal point for attention.
Simplicity allows viewers to concentrate and appreciate what matters most while helping them disregard what doesn't.
Simplicity separates the wheat from the chaff, the critical from the superfluous, the important from the less so.
The Power of Simplicity has been an essential subject for designers and communicators to encourage focus, meaning, and action.

An Ironic Sales Technique

An Ironic Sales Technique

As I wrote in my last book, ?, and as our group discusses in my Strategic Roundtables, sometimes the most sales technique is to turn your liability into an asset. Or, as I wrote in the book, “Make Your Scar Your Star.”
The simple humanity of accepting and presenting our fallibility – whether planned or not – works in sales, branding, and life.

Increased Business Opportunity for Solopreneurs

Increased Business Opportunity for Solopreneurs

If we find this example of a business staring us in the face on something we see all the time, imagine how many more opportunities are out there just waiting to be pounced on.
swirl all around us all the time. All you have to do is pay attention, separate the need from the noise, and start creating the solution.
And then, once you figure out what that solution could be, you have to strike while the iron's hot. Because as my dad used to say, “When a business opportunity knocks, you can't say, ‘Come back later.'”

Super Bowl Commercials

Super Bowl Commercials

The quality of the 57 Super Bowl commercials can all be judged by how much liquid you produced when you watched them.
A commercial was delectable if it made your mouth water.
A commercial was touching if it made you tear up a little.
And a commercial was funny if it caused you to pass your drink through your nose.
But if all the commercial did was give you a good excuse to get up and go to the bathroom, then that's about all it was worth.

What's Your Story?

What's Your Story?

Take a moment to revisit a time when you made a decision, along with a list of the pros and cons involved. Looking back, you'll realize how little you comprehended the consequences of your choices. For example, you might have taken a job because you believed it would propel you in a specific direction, only to glance at the desk next to you and fall head over heels in love with the person sitting there. You end up marrying that person and completely altering your life. Looking at it this way, you realize that you didn't fully grasp what you were doing—you were making the best choice you could at the time.
That brings us back to Hopkins' question: What's your story?

Sadness or Euphoria?

Sadness or Euphoria?

Think about the news these days. Regardless of which end of the seesaw you're sitting on, there's a good chance you believe you are rational and the people who disagree with you are insane.
Yes or no? Good or bad? Black or white? Up or down? Right or wrong? Democrat or Republican? Bi-polar disease or today's global reality?
Billy Joel summed it up almost 50 years ago, “Though we choose between reality and madness, it's either sadness or euphoria.”

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